Reggae Music Forever

Our special guest was Shawn from the Reggae Talk podcast and Reggae Music Forever blog.

Certainly, we discussed the state of dancehall/reggae culture with Shawn aka Reggae Music Forever including topics:

  • Firstly, Dancehall supporters versus die-hard fans of roots reggae.
  • Secondly, The overlooked conscious dancehall movement.
  • In addition, The American reggae scene.
  • Also, Comparing white and black Americans’ taste in reggae.
  • Reggae Talk Podcast 1-year Anniversary event.
  • Other passions outside of reggae.
  • Is reggae music on life-support?
  • In conclusion, Predictions for the future.

Resources:

Reggae Music Forever image for Reggae Lover Podcast episode cover

Transcription:

198 – Reggae Lover – Reggae Music Forever (REPLAY).mp3 transcript powered by Sonix—easily convert your audio to text with Sonix.

198 – Reggae Lover – Reggae Music Forever (REPLAY).mp3 was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the latest audio-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors. Sonix is the best audio automated transcription service in 2020. Our automated transcription algorithms works with many of the popular audio file formats.

Intro voiceover:
Welcome to the Reggae Lover podcast!

Kahlil Wonda:
Reggae Lover podcast, Kahlil Wonda in the Building.

AGARD:
AGARD here. Whattup?

Kahlil Wonda:
Thanks for tuning in. Big up to NICEUPRADIO.COM and all the listeners in podcast land.

AGARD:
I have been getting some good feedback with these replays. You know, today’s episode is another replay. People have been reaching out to me that I guess didn’t hear some of these episodes live. Even though we recorded intros and outros, they’re thinking it’s new content. So shout out to everybody listening to these episodes for the first time. All the new listeners. We appreciate you. Brand new season starting next week.

Kahlil Wonda:
That’s right. So come July 2020, brand new episodes. So today’s show is one of those replays from the archives where we sat down with a young man that’s known as Reggae Music Forever.

AGARD:
Yeah, man.

Kahlil Wonda:
Called episode reggae music forever. And Shawn, the host of Reggae Talk Podcast is that individual. He’s a microblogger, reggae music advocate at large.

AGARD:
Definitely someone who we appreciate to have in the culture and the community. This particular episode we got together. He was live in the studio with me. We were recording from Brooklyn. Kahlil was in Atlanta. And this episode has a lot of vibes because all of us are very passionate about what we do and reggae music. So I think it really does come across in this episode. We touched a number of topics that I’m sure you guys will enjoy.

Kahlil Wonda:
Without further ado, here is Reggae Music Forever.

Kahlil Wonda:
We have the pleasure of being joined by one of the most engaging reggae bloggers on the Internet. Fellow podcasters as well. We are joined by Sean from the reggae talk podcast. Sean, a.k.a. Reggae Music Forever. What’s good, brother?

Reggae Music Forever:
Bless up Kahlil. Bless up AGARD, you know. Give thanks for having me on this program. Big up everybody. Give thanks.

Kahlil Wonda:
Thank you so much for joining us on Reggae Lover. So let’s get into it, man. Like you have over 25000 followers on the Reggae Music Forever blog, which is posted on Instagram. I study marketing, so I know that traditionally when people think of blogs, they think of WordPress or Blogspot or something like that. You’ve gone to the microblog, the social platform of Instagram, and really took it to like a whole nother level where you are able to post videos and photos pretty much, you know, very consistently. It seems like every day, almost every day or several times a day, I don’t know. But you have engagement, hundreds of comments on certain posts and people, you know, really getting into debates surrounding our culture. I’m interested in finding out, like why you chose to take to that format in such a way and be a reggae lover, but not just a reggae lover, like a super reggae lover, like, you know, our reggae blogger.

Reggae Music Forever:
You know, when I first of all, reggae, reggae and. So that’s my way of life. That’s my lifestyle. I live it. Breathe it. Yeah. And I quote, We call ourselves the voice of reason for the culture. So many years ago. Well, not too long ago, I noticed on social media that social media really thrives on passa passa. People love the passa passa. The love the hoopla. I love the hoopla, but I also love to reason, you know, and I felt that there was no reasoning going on in the culture a couple years ago. A few years ago. So I started. I mean, like you said, you study marketing. I study business as well. That’s my, you know, my undergrad was in business. So you know I have a little know-how. I have a background. So I just decided to, like, cultivate my own lane. Cultivate my own path and go about it differently. And, you know, it’s all about branding. A typical blog on social media, they don’t show their face. That’s one thing with me. I show my face. People know who I am. People know I have kids. People know I’m married. It’s like the full package. And at the end of the day, people have to buy into what you’re doing. And it must come to life. So along with people seeing who I am, they see my lifestyle. You know, they believe what I’m doing. And most of all, they believe in the way I deliver my, you know, my content. I engage with people before people start talking about engagement. I was engaging with people. You go on YouTube right now and you ask people and people put up, you know, like, how do I build my following? The number one thing is, you know, you have to engage. I’ve been engaging with people for years. I’ve created bonds and relationships. You know, I respond to people, you know, on social media. People love when you respond to them. When you allow them to feel like they’re part of what you’re doing. I’ve been doing that for five years and it’s paid dividends. There is a lot of tactics. We can talk about later on. I don’t want to give away everything.

Kahlil Wonda:
It’s not a marketing show that, you know, you could do a different podcast to talk about the business in-depth.

Reggae Music Forever:
Exactly.

Kahlil Wonda:
Yes. And it shows. It shows, you know. So, like for people who haven’t checked it out. And please do check out reggae music forever on Instagram. You know, you curate content, which many people do. Other people do it. But what makes it very unique is your captions and how they kind of arrest the browser so that, you know, people stop what they’re doing and put thought to the questions that you pose and they feel sucked in. I’m saying I know it’s happened to me several times. It’s happened to you, AGARD.

AGARD:
Yeah, definitely.

Kahlil Wonda:
You sit there, you fire off a response, and then you’re reading through and you know what I mean. But it’s not the level of ignorance that becomes really toxic online. A lot of times, you know, I’m saying this is very good energy to it. So, you know, I want to just go through some of the things that we’ve noticed. A lot of this is what we talk about on Reggae Lover as well. I know one of your underlying themes is kind of like a dancehall versus reggae theme. And I think your focus with that is more about around the supporters of each style of the music. Can you talk about that a little bit?

Reggae Music Forever:
All right. So, I mean, from my experience, my lifestyle, from just going out and, you know, feeling the energy and listen to people. I mean, since I’ve known myself, I just feel it is always like a dichotomy, like a riff between reggae roots lovers and dancehall lovers. It’s all it’s always like a back and forth. And, you know, I remember I’ll put up something one time saying that it’s one reggae music. And, you know, when the page went off into a tailspin, crazy dancehall people said no. Dancehall A Dancehall. Roots people said, no. No way can you mix, Dancehall with a reggae and all this kind of stuff. But I just feel like the dancehall people. They kind of like turned a nose at the roots people because they feel they’re a little bit too self-righteous. And the roots people, they feel dancehall, hardcore dancehall people are, you know, just too lewd and, you know, erratic and, you know, and, you know, regular Rastaman, you know, they turn your nose at the culture. And in all actuality, you know, the way I see it is one Jamaican culture. We all hail from the same neighborhoods. We come from the same place. You know, I say we live the same life. It’s just that, what’s for you is for you and what’s for me is for me. So who are you to judge the way I live? And vice versa.

Kahlil Wonda:
When you said is one music. Is that what your true belief is, is that it’s really, you know, one music, regardless of what you call it, or do you have to call it a particular name or what is it?

Reggae Music Forever:
Jamaican music.

Kahlil Wonda:
Ok.

Reggae Music Forever:
That’s what I mean when I say its one music. Its Jamaican music.

Kahlil Wonda:
All right.

AGARD:
Yeah, I think we we we kind of got to that place when we did a similar episode where I was like, yo, cause because you have so many things mixed up right now in terms of the production that you can’t. It is like the genres are mixing in and out of each other, like artists like I-Octane, Right. I mean, is that a Rasta artist? Is that a dancehall artist? Is he a sing Jay. Is he a singer?

Reggae Music Forever:
Right on.

AGARD:
Yes. So you know that I agree with that. Its Jamaican music.

Kahlil Wonda:
Yeah, definitely is Jamaican music. You know, I mean, and for the people who are into the separating into genres for different reasons, categorically speak in Jamaica has produced like eight genres and, you know, in some people’s opinion is on the verge of formulating a ninth genre now.

Reggae Music Forever:
Yeah,

Kahlil Wonda:
But, you know, I think the people that really are knowledgeable about the history and culture, especially Jamaican people, man, I don’t want to go into ageism, but, you know, I think for some younger folks, you know, it’s more like, “oh, this is my music and da da da…” Versus your music. But, you know, I think the older heads and the people that really know the thing know the music of today is reggae. And dancehall is a culture. You know, I mean, dancehall is a place. And so that’s the way that I look at it. You know, I’m saying I can’t really get into the separatist argument.

Reggae Music Forever:
I mean, we can talk about this. We can go back and forth all day because that’s one thing I’ve been grappled with. And that’s been one of the you know, as you said earlier, the underlying themes of my blog. The separatist culture. And that’s something that bothers me. It bothers me is. It’s a major, major, major issue that’s plaguing our people. Its this the separate, whether it is between Reggae and dancehall. Whether it’s between the 6six. Whether its between the Gully, the Gaza. The (Ven)Detta? Why does it have to be like that?

Kahlil Wonda:
Right. So now there’s this new trend of conscious dancehall that’s, you know, I would say is growing now or it emerged, you know, a few years back or reemerged because it’s something that is cyclical. Right. You know, so it’s always been an ebb and flow with more raunchy or more conscious, you know, if you look at the music over time. So we were coming out of a time where it was a little bit more raunchy, a little bit more violent. And then some more collaboration started to take place with some of the Roots artists and some of the dancehall artists. And some of the production started to change, whereas faster rhythms and infusing some hip hop songs and some other genres. Melodies and things like that. And so, you know, you have the Chronixx with songs like “Likes” and now you have Koffee. But, you know, even before that you have Popcaan and Dre Island, you know, did the combination you know talking about “we pray” and you know, so there is that segment of dancehall right now.

Reggae Music Forever:
Verhon, “Inna Real Life.”

Kahlil Wonda:
Jahmiel. You know, just about everybody. Everybody has at least one song, right? Where…

Reggae Music Forever:
Yes.

Kahlil Wonda:
Completely different than their normal catalog.

Masicka. Masicka does a lot of conscious. You see this is the thing. No one talks about it. I actually shed light on it some time ago. There’s a movement when it comes to the conscious dancehall songs.

Kahlil Wonda:
Sasco!

Reggae Music Forever:
It’s as powerful. Yeah, “we winning right now, we winning right now yea…” We can go on and on. I’ve seen mixes. I’ve seen mixes on SoundCloud, just straight up conscious Dancehall. I feel that those songs don’t get the credit they deserve. As opposed to a Roots song, you know, me a say? Its delivered differently. Of course, the production is usually not rootsy or it’s not the hardcore dancehall. However, the content, the subject matter is very, very conscious. But I kind of feel like, you know, no one don’t. It doesn’t really get any in any it doesn’t it doesn’t get the accolades or the attention in advance. It is a lot of artists. Deep Jahi is a is an uprising artist right now. I mean, so many artists were singing conscious lyrics. But the sound is a little bit different from what we’re used to. Yeah. I don’t think people notice or it doesn’t really go anywhere. I don’t know.

AGARD:
So my question about that is, do you think people are just writing it off as a gimmick? For the dancehall artists? They just have one or two tunes like that. And its like “oh its a gimmicks thing,” or What do you think about that?

Reggae Music Forever:
That’s a good point. I put a proposal like this on social media @Reggaemusicforever. And someone wrote one week the artist is singing about killing somebody. And how are they going to kill somebody circle your ends and buss shot and all kind of, you know, I mean. And then the next week, they’re singing. They’re singing about love. And he’s singing about, you know, reality and social commentary. Rather. So maybe people don’t take them seriously. But as you know, life is about balance.

Kahlil Wonda:
Right. You know, the last episode we talked about spirituality in reggae and, you know…

Great episode, by the way. Great episode. I didn’t get around to telling you guys. Great episode because, sorry to cut you off. You spoke about Luciano and Luciano saved my life.

Kahlil Wonda:
Yeah.

Reggae Music Forever:
Many times.

Kahlil Wonda:
Seen.

Reggae Music Forever:
Yeah man, when I listen to Luciano I feel like I’m in church.

Kahlil Wonda:
Give thanks, man. I mean, I was reasoning with a Rasta brethren and you know, Bredrin hails from Portmore Scheme. He reminds me that, you know, there are a lot of people that come from that same area. Kartel’s crew and, you know, you have Jah Bouks. And one set of the Rastaman them and they all, everybody knows each other. And everybody knows that… And then that’s the thing about Jamaica. Bounty Killer’s first album is called “Roots, Reality, and Culture.” He had a song on there. The single “roots, reality and culture. A long time way of it, but the world just a ask me for, Roots, Reality, and Culture…” Right? But the song that people gravitated to was “Copper Shot.” So that’s always been the thing. You know, it’s kind of like… And whatever people first hear, how they first experience you, Hear you. That’s what’s stuck in their head. So it’s always hard to except you coming with something else. But I think that if the artist, the produces. If everyone just keeps that variety, keeps that reality in what they do as opposed to being like predominantly gun lyrics or whatnot, like yo let’s be realistically like you’re not really killing that many people.

Reggae Music Forever:
You’re not killing anyone.

Kahlil Wonda:
Yeah. I’m saying like. Yeah. I mean, you fall in love. You go out on dates. You have heartbreak, you know what I mean? And another thing about Jamaican music is that artists will sit down and pen something where the song they’re talking to God into song. It’s like it’s a conversation between them and their creator. Even the dancehall artists. That’s a part of life. So I think that the dancehall, the reggae, the conscious, the reality, the roots. There’s all there’s a place for all of it.

Reggae Music Forever:
There’s a thing in Jamaican culture, or rather. Rather more so, I guess dancehall culture is a thing called a so di thing set. I so de things. Set. If you really don’t. If you really don’t understand the culture. You’re not gonna understand what that means. There’s no rhyme or reason behind a lot of these songs and a lot of these antics because a just so di thing set. Case in point, the other day, Popcaan made a statement. I put it up on social media and that one went… That post went crazy. Popcaan. You guys remember? Popcaan was saying something about. I think he was on tour with Drake and he was telling artists: “yo, artists. Listen, easy on the gun lyrics, because it’s not gonna give you hits. But I’m still gonna sing gun lyrics.” So he kind of like, I dunno if you guys saw that one. I put it up. He kind of like contradicted himself. I just so the thing set and a lot of people came on a blog and they said, “yo, listen, Gun lyrics haffi sing.” “Badman lyrics haffi sing.” People love it. But at the same time.nAt the same time, the same thing that artists sing about, when it comes to life, then you don’t love it anymore. You know, when you lose a family member by the gun the artist is singing about in the same fashion. You don’t love it anymore. But the following week when artists sing the song again, you love it again.

Kahlil Wonda:
Right.

AGARD:
Yeah. Popcaan is an interesting artist because A lot of my friends who hardly listen to dancehall like I grew up with them in the 90s, like that’s the album that they play on repeat. And before that it was Movado. You know, I’m saying like those are the two artists recently that my American brought up friends. They play on repeat. And the thing about Popcaan, he still is talking about love. He’s told about the ghetto. He’s talking about a lot of things. But it’s not in your face like someone like if a Masika. Or Aidonia. It’s real graphic. Popcaan is painting a picture, but I get what he’s saying because if it wasn’t for those types of songs, he wouldn’t be big in The States, you know, amongst people who aren’t even Caribbean.

Reggae Music Forever:
Popcaan delivery. I mean, you said Popcaan and Movado. The delivery lies a lot on clarity. Popcaan has a lot of clarity, if you really listen to the way he structures his songs. Macado, likewise. But they also sing a lot of “marrow pon tar.” They sing a lot of gun lyrics. “Me nuh carry feelings. Me carry me gun dem…” So a just so de ting set. And if you’re not Jamaican, if you’re not Jamaican and you just you know, you’re from Europe, where you from wherever you are, you just love Proteje and Chronixx and you hear these guys singing about, you know, guns and how to murder people. You know, you’re going to be aggravated. You’re going gonna be saying all these things. You know, these Jamaican guys, you know, it’s not the same. You know, it’s not the same anymore.And, you know, some people, they pick bits and pieces of the culture, but they don’t understand the culture holistically and they use what they understand just to judge the culture. And I don’t think that’s right. Understand. Understand us, who we are, where we come from and how we live holistically.

Kahlil Wonda:
Here’s a thing that’s slight to me is, you know, you have reality tunes where an artist is talking about their environment. And it’s kind of like storytelling or it’s not necessarily always just social commentary.It just may be storytelling. Like, you know, I saw I seen this and that. This amount of traumatic things in my life. And this is my music. So you’re going to hear about it. So you understand where I’m coming from as an artist. I think that’s one thing. But then there’s also taking it to the next level where it’s glorification of violence or even like fantasizing, romanticizing, fantasizing. This gun culture. And I think that’s a whole nother thing.

Reggae Music Forever:
Yeah, I agree.

Kahlil Wonda:
So I don’t know for in terms of my personals, I’m not going to sit there and listen to these type of songs.

Reggae Music Forever:
I agree.

Kahlil Wonda:
You know, well, I went out when I go to a party and I told a story to AGARD like I went out and it was on the Beer Vibe’s something, you know. It’s a big party they have like a couple of times a year here in Atlanta. Free promo. Free promo. So anyhow, they had Steelie Bashment. He came down with DJ Polish. It was a good lineup, you know, and I’m out with my wife and her girls. It’s like about, you know, six, seven girls. We roll in the place, so I’m in a good vibes and juggling is good. And like the couple times that certain Kartel tunes came on and it was, you know, very violent. And on the same rhythm as some of the other juggling, you know, like instinctually I gave the forward. I put my hand up. But then at the same time in the back of my mind, I’m like, yeah, I’m like, wait a minute.

AGARD:
Like, you felt bad.

Kahlil Wonda:
What is this yo like? The energy is so different and.

Reggae Music Forever:
Well, let me ask you this.

Kahlil Wonda:
No, I was going just… You know, I’m a big sound clash fan. I’m saying so like that is the reason that I love those gun tunes. Because if you’re in a clash and you know, it’s kind of like for people we’ve talked about this before, people just, you know, I’m gonna use some different examples. Like if you talk to comedians, you know, I’m saying and you like, yo, how is your show? “I killed it. Know, I mean, I murdered. I murdered them all,” It’s not like it’s not violence. It’s entertainment. But that’s just the terminology. So it’s the same thing with sound clash and dancehall. Know, I mean, I kill them all, whatever. “Killed them all and done, Kill them all…” And, um, but it’s not like anybody’s physically harming like everybody understands that it’s for the sport, for the competition, it’s aggression. And, you know, it’s a certain level of masculinity. So I feel like in that arena it makes sense. So for that reason, I don’t want all the songs coming out of Jamaica to be soft. You’ve got to have a certain level, a “hardcoreness” to be able to kind of you know. There’s a time and a place for that, is what I’m saying neatly.

Reggae Music Forever:
So I agree with you 100 percent, because Jamaican culture is very colorful. We’re very animated people. We’re very passionate people. So the music is consistent with who we are. We’re not bland people. Our stuff got to have a lot of seasoning. You have a lot of seasoning. And it’s just non-stop. It’s a very dynamic and fast paced. Therefore, the music is dynamic and fast paced. Case in point, when I go to Uptown Mondays… Whenever I go to Jamaica, I always go to Uptown Mondays. I was down there maybe about a month ago. I don’t know if you guys have ever been to Uptown Mondays, but it’s a whole production, bro. I mean, between the cameramen and the dancers and the deejays and the lighting its just electrifying. I heard Seanie B from BBC 1extra. He was talking about Uptown Monday’s the other day, and I felt the same way. Every time I go down, I feel the same way. I mean, and that’s the thing that makes our culture. So it’s like such a phenomenon, you know, and people from all over the world want it, want to be a part of it. They want a piece of it. They want to learn it because… It’s just… Its also enigmatic because some people just don’t get it. Some people just don’t get it. And that’s why I get very angry when people take bits and pieces of our culture that they don’t understand and they use their little bits and pieces. That little piece and they judge us as a whole.

AGARD:
Yeah. I mean, that happens a lot with hip hop and all that stuff too. To where people feel like they take the most colorful aspect of it or the most extreme aspect of it. And because it’s so jarring to them. Yeah. You know, they fight against it. They don’t do the research to see why is this that way and why is this this way? Similar with hip hop, you know its social commentary, a lot of it. I know that nowadays a lot of it is entertainment for entertainment purposes, but there’s still a lot of it that’s, you know, like all the songs that deal with bad mine. You know, there’s a reason, you know, there’s a reason why there’s so many songs about bad mind because, as one of Stone Love selectors say “badmind is a disease, right? Yeah. So, you know, they’re trying to address that, you know.

Kahlil Wonda:
Yes. Deadliest disease. Deadlier than AIDS.

Reggae Music Forever:
I want to appeal to all your fans. All the reggae lovers from around the world to take some time to understand the culture before you judge the culture. If you see something that’s marginal, if you see something that doesn’t really sit well with you, maybe you really don’t understand the culture. Understand it. I mean, Marvin, Marvin talk about all the time. I think the stuff that Marvin do, whatever his antics, I think is very provocative. It might not be safe, but I think it’s provocative and that’s unique to the culture.

AGARD:
Performance art.

Kahlil Wonda:
You’re absolutely right. It’s hard to put yourself in the mind of the people that born and grow in certain areas in Jamaica, because a lot of times, if you’re from certain areas, you have limited options and you have limited outlets. So the dancehall, it’s on a whole nother level. It’s not just music like people. “Oh, I’ll turn on my iPod.” You know, it’s like it is life itself.

Reggae Music Forever:
And for a lot people… Kahlil, You put it perfectly because nuff people I see listen to the music from all over the world, from Russia, from Australia, from all over the world. And to them, it’s just music. Them turn on the music and them listen to some Konshens and them listen some Vybz Kartel. There in Sweden, or there in wherever. It’s just music. But for many people, it’s a way of life. Yeah, it’s not (just) music. It’s a way of life from you wake, from you go to work, you come from work, you’re at work. You stop at one Rum bar. Eat a box Food. You drink some rum. And then you go home, you go out again. It’s a non-stop seven day a week… Its a way of life. Its not just turning on your MP3 player whatever your iPhone and listen to a song. It’s a culture. It’s a way of life. Its a livity. levityAnd people if if if you really subscribe to Jamaican music, you need to take some time to understand the culture, understand the way of life before you cast judgment on what you see and what you hear.

Kahlil Wonda:
So you guys are in New York right now. And I know you just had a one-year anniversary party for your Reggae Talk podcast where you’re able to do something that a lot of podcasters aren’t able to do is transition from that platform into doing an event like a local event that was well supported by a local community there. And you had artists, a lineup of different artists and bands and deejays that actually performed at the anniversary party. So talk to us a little bit about that event, why you staged it the way that you did, and also, obviously, your support supporting local artists, independent artists. What’s your take on the reggae scene there and your pie of the world where you are?

Reggae Music Forever:
All right. So on May 11th, 2019, we had our one year anniversary for Reggae Talk podcast, and pretty much the format of the event was different from the typical party party. You know, we wanted to do something different. So pretty much my family, actually, AKA FAreal. He was a guest on the reggae lover podcast.

Kahlil Wonda:
Big Fareal. Anyway you deh.

Reggae Music Forever:
Fareal is an artist, dope artist. In his own right. He has a band. He does gigs around the city. He’s doing his thing, right now. He’s a dancehall reggae artist. He has his own band and everything. So, you know, we’re trying to last… As a matter of fact, we had our launch last year. [Right] On a smaller scale. It was well attended with the band, of course. Same format. So pretty much what we wanted to do was to bring value. We want to bring value to the night as opposed just keeping an event playing some music and sending people home. So we said, why not just use the band? And since we talk about our mantra is to build each other up, why not have some of the best upcoming artists, local artists from around town perform? And then after the performances, then we’ll have the party. That’s what we did last year. And we realized that, you know, it turned out smaller scale, but it was well attended. And this year, people came out in throngs relatively. I mean, over 200 people. People flew in from Florida, Atlanta, Canada. They drove from Philly. You know, and it proved to us that, you know, the movement is moving. People are buying into what we’re doing.

Kahlil Wonda:
That’s awesome.

AGARD:
Yeah. Man its making big waves, man. For us and we’re just starting off our talking aspect of our podcast. But definitely it gives us hope and encouragement. Know that you guys have a grass roots movement and actually see people on the ground support it. So, you know, I’m saying we tip our hats to you, to men.

Reggae Music Forever:
Much respect man. And again, you guys are definitely one of our inspirations. I’ve been checking out Reggae Lover Podcast for years. When you guys did the, you know, like you do like a Terry Linen showcase, or you do like artists, whatever.

AGARD:
That’s all that man. Right there.

Reggae Music Forever:
I’ve been checking out Kahlil Wonda for years. And I definitely listen to it. Sometimes you guys would have, like, you know, like artists. You do interviews and all that stuff. Definitely check you guys out. Because in our world, when it comes to the podcasts or whatever, it is not too many of us.

AGARD:
There’s a lot of Internet radio, but not a lot of podcasts.

Kahlil Wonda:
Big up to the listeners, man, because I couldn’t do it without them. And I appreciate the vote of confidence. Big up to everybody who really, you know, listens in and supports to help this thing keep going. And, you know, in a way that it is cause, you know, I was talking with AGARD. You know, we… I see that New York is kind of like its own bubble, its own eco system, where you have a scene, you know. Some people say it’s healthy. Some people say it’s struggling. And that’s probably been the case for a long time, you know, off and on whatnot. We spent some time talking about understanding dancehall and reggae culture from a Jamaican standpoint. I just want to throw out there like there’s this thing now where white America has grasped onto reggae music and it’s not necessarily a new thing. I’d say it’s like at least the last 30 years or so, probably more. But I’d say in the last 30 years is when you’ve really seen an uprising of white reggae bands who have their own audiences, which are predominantly white folks. A lot of them are on the west coast of the country from Washington, are gone down the hall to California and, you know, Arizona, Colorado, all that out there, man. And then, of course, Hawaii, the Hawaiian Islands as well. So, you know, I think, like, there is another bubble over there where they have their own reggae festivals and just their own industry. It’s just separate and one and away from what’s going on on the East Coast and what’s going on in the Caribbean and, you know, and the rest of the world. And some people get upset like, oh, yo they’re doing this and they’re not including enough Jamaicans. They’re not including us. I don’t necessarily see it that way. I just think it’s an interesting study to do some more research on it. But then you have African-Americans who, from what I see, don’t really gravitate to reggae the same way that white Americans do. And if they do, it’s not roots reggae. You know, I’m saying most of them would have to be one of the songs that is kind of targeted at them. It’s got to have Kahled on it. It’s got to have, you know, Tyga or, you know, a hip hop beat or something like that. But if it’s like a pure form of reggae, it seems that African-Americans reject it. So, you know, what’s your viewpoint on that? Like, why do you think that is?

Reggae Music Forever:
Why do I think what, black folks? Oh, yeah.

Kahlil Wonda:
Why? Why do black folks over here, black folks, reject the reggae culture?

AGARD:
That’s a very unique question.

Reggae Music Forever:
That’s a great question. I’ve asked that question before myself, too. Why don’t you know roots reggae music crossover to urban?

Kahlil Wonda:
Right. That’s the word right, urban? Urban radio? It’s like Yes. OutSide of New York… In New York you hear some reggae bouncing every now and then on a mainstream channel. But maybe in Miami, maybe. Maybe in D.C., I don’t know. But anywhere else, you got 50 states. What’s good?

Reggae Music Forever:
Real talk. That’s a great question. You know what? I’m going to liken the dancehall to the hip hop. Especially when it comes to the subject matter, for the most part. Dancehall subject matter is very trendy. It is very dynamic, its very disposable. And you’ll find the same parallels in hip hop. It’s the same thing. Dynamic, disposable. Hip hop fans. I’m kind of like… It’s kind of like a blanket statement. I’m not trying to, like, piss off the Most Def fans or the Nas fans or, you know, those realms. But in general, hip hop fans love dynamic. Oh, no, no. Marginal lyrics. The majority of the dancehall. You know, that always crossover, its always marginal. Its just party stuff as opposed to listen to like a Chronixx. The hardcore roots meditation. That’s easy… That’s a harder sell as opposed to like a dancehall rhythm that incites shaking your ass. Shaking your booty rather, whatever.

Kahlil Wonda:
Yeah. So I, you know, not to be but you know, you say that and I was just thinking something else but that’s another good point. Like for hip for most and let’s just say hip hop fans, you know, we’re going down this road. Let’s just go all the way down. Let’s dive in, put it on a table. Right as Chin would say. So. All right. So yeah, a lot of it. And, you know, we used to call them Yankees, not derogatory. But, you know, I’m saying most of the hip hop…

Reggae Music Forever:
But when I just came to America back in the day. Middle school they used to tell me to go back on a banana boat. They used to call me coconut.

Kahlil Wonda:
So yeah. That tune changed a little bit once the 90s guy underway. It went from that to everybody trying to have a Jamaican accent, but that’s another thing. But yeah. But again, you know, New York is still a little bit different. Right. But hip hop lovers, you know, that love dancehall. A lot of them. It’s only because it’s how the girls dance, you know. So when you mentioned yeah the girl shaking her ass whatever, you know. Its either that that draws them in or they like to smoke weed. So, you know, if they hear a song somebody is singing about a spliff or something, they’re like, “oh, yo, that’s fire,” you know?

Reggae Music Forever:
“One spliff a day keep the evil away…” .

Kahlil Wonda:
Exactly. Exactly. And most of us are like, man, this song is trash. I’m sure it’s going to do very well commercially. Great trash.

AGARD:
It’s funny because I think Kahlil sent me a clip of that song. I say, yo, it’s enough for us, man. No, no. It’s going to be real big, but its not for us.

Kahlil Wonda:
So, yeah. Kahled knows what he’s doing. He couldn’t just put real reggae on the album and put it out. It would’nt work. So I guess we don’t have an answer to this. We’re gonna find an answer on the reggae lover podcast. Make sure you stay tuned.

AGARD:
Well, I got a quick opinion about that. It’s like I feel like ghetto people are ghetto people no matter where I’m at. Right. And some of the dancehall stuff that gets popular is ghetto people music in a sense. Right. And everybody is looking for the quick fix, the quick hi. And I’m saying, yeah, that’s one thing. The one reason why it’s popular amongst certain people in America. In the hood. But then is another thing is the exposure, you know, radio, terrestrial radio, you know, everybody’s following everybody else. And if there’s not that exposure, it just doesn’t get played like that. Internet. I don’t know. It’s a different story nowadays, but I could only say for in terms of radio and broadcasting. You know, I’m saying Internet. I don’t know where the kids are getting the influence nowadays.

Reggae Music Forever:
But check this out, again to kind of further attempt to answer that question. I would say a Protoje, is equivalent to a Most Def. You can get where I’m going.

Kahlil Wonda:
OK.

Reggae Music Forever:
So it’s like when it comes to like Protejé and Mos Def, it’s more like a niche. It’s more like a niche. People really subscribe to them kind of lyrics. But as far as like a like the mainstream mass appeal its different. You know, “whine up like a party gal…” People don’t have patience to listen to, you know, especially if… You remember with the roots its not really much of a language barrier. Not really much a language barrier because the roots artists for the most part, articulate, you know, no matter what. People generally understand what they’re saying. But with the dancehall it’s different. But the energy is different, even if you can’t understand what they’re saying. It still makes you move more. It is arguably more infectious to someone who is not really in tune with the culture. I don’t know.

Kahlil Wonda:
Yeah, yeah. No, no, you’re right. You’re right. I mean, Protejé fans, you know, like to listen to lyrics. Thought-provoking lyrics likeWise a Mos Def fan would. But, you know, one thing it’s interesting you would say, Mos, because you know, Mos doesn’t really. He’s been. What’s the word I want to use? Disenfranchised? What’s the. Is that the right word? Yeah. He’s rejected the. The U.S. B.S. and you know, he’s checked out. You know, a la Like the way Chappelle did a few years ago before he came back.

Reggae Music Forever:
But at the pinnacle of his career, though. At the pinnacle of Mos Def’s career, I’ve been around long enough, He still wasn’t mainstream.

Kahlil Wonda:
But the thing about it, he may not be mainstream here. I mean, which. Okay, let’s just say it. He does really great movies, by the way. Love Mos Def in a movie, great actor. But from what I’ve heard, like his demand because he’s not out there, his demand is crazy. And I mean globally. And I think it’s similarly, you know, it’s just jump back. So, you know, we talk about, Protejé on Chronixx. They’re hitting the stages in California. And thee reggae Cali roots, festivals and stuff right now, this year. They’re hitting stages in Europe, all over the world. It’s just crazy that here in America you have all these black people that, you know, it’s just it’s no it’s no different than when Bob was touring and Bob was performing to majority white audiences. And, you know, it wasn’t until his show at Madison Square Garden, New York…

Reggae Music Forever:
But it wasn’t urban. Well, it wasn’t.

Kahlil Wonda:
No, no, no. But the Madison Square Garden show was one of the only times there was a lot of black people in the crowd that he performed in America. And that’s because it was. Frankie Crocker. And what’s the group Agard?

AGARD:
I don’t know Maize. No Commodores. Commodores, I think you said.

Kahlil Wonda:
Yeah. Yeah, exactly. The Commodores. Lionel Richie and the Commodores. And Kurtis Blow and them. So it was the radio station of the time, the urban station. They were a part of the promotion. So they filled Madison Square Garden with black American(s). That audience took in Bob Marley for the first time that night. And that’s the first time he started to like, really grow a fan base in urban black America. So some people from that generation will know Bob and they’ll at least recognize Bob for that But… Yeah, man.

Reggae Music Forever:
Question. Do you think the roots artists target urban audience?

Kahlil Wonda:
Well, not the urban the way that we’re using that term, but I feel like there are kids that listen to that. You know, there’s people that still like real hip hop and they would listen to cultural music, whatever it is.

Reggae Music Forever:
I asked you that because the dancehall artists I mean, every dancehall artist’s dream is to cross over and be big in America and cross over and be on…

Kahlil Wonda:
So you’re saying that’s why their lyrics are so ignorant right now?

Reggae Music Forever:
Probably. Be on Hot 97 and be big-time across the states and everything trickles down everywhere else.

Well, there’s a few different things I could say to tie this together a little bit with the Roots artists. You know, we’re talking about, you know, Protejé, Chronixx. Those people right. I feel like they have actual business models and marketing in place and their management is international, you know. We were speaking to Cross from Unity Sound. Right. And he was talking about I think its Piere. Might have been somebody who manages Chronixx. And he said, look, every performance you have, you have to have a band. You know, I’m saying they do the things on a certain level in a certain way. But then what Cross also said is a lot of artists in terms of dancehall artists nowadays, artists, they want you to push on a song. But by the time you start pushing it, they’re already onto the next one. It brings to mind like an interview with Beyonce a couple of years ago where she said everything is Waves. Now, you know, I’m saying so its like By the time you come out with a hit, the next week, somebody is there to knock you off your pedestal. And I think that type of thing is also going on in dancehall. It’s the business of it. Not only the subject matter is.. I think it’s closed off from a lot of the general population in America and other places. But then the business model, that’s just my, you know, anecdotal thing, like I feel like the business model isn’t quite dead for it to push actual singles for a certain amount of time. You have artists like Charlie Black. You have artists like Kranium. You know, these artists that are international or Shaggy or even Sean Paul, who are doing things with international artists in a way that they’re pushing this stuff for you know, half a year, maybe even a year sometimes.

Reggae Music Forever:
That’s just the nature of dancehall. Dancehall moves at the speed of light, bro. As one rhythm drop you ready for another one. As one song drop, you start Yo, want a next Alkaline.. Me want a next Kartel. And people want it. So you got to keep feeding them, Dancehall is… Yeah. It just moves very fast, it’s very dynamic.

AGARD:
So my question is this. Should there be two strategies for these artists? Definitely. Sometimes that happens right where it’s like your feed… Because that’s what happened in the 90s. I feel like Bounty and Beenie And those artists, you know, when they came out with albums on American labels, it was music that we had already been hearing for like two years. Yeah. You know, for the American audience.

Reggae Music Forever:
But then we’re unhappy.

AGARD:
Right. Well, it wasn’t for us. Right. That just crossed my mind. You know, like two strategies.

Kahlil Wonda:
So can you do both? Is it realistic? Because, you know, it seems like it’s not an easy… Obviously it’s not an easy thing to do. You know, like a handful of people and I mean, literally probably five people have ever done it where they’re churning out hits and they’re hot and dancehall. But at the same time, they have crossover stuff going on outside of Jamaica.

AGARD:
Let’s see if Shenseaa can do it.

Reggae Music Forever:
It’s just not easy, because as soon as they have heard anything from you in a, let’s see, three months…

Kahlil Wonda:
You flop like John Crow wings.

Reggae Music Forever:
Yeah man you pop down. Nothing nah gwaan for you. Yeah man. You’re done, you’re finished. Meanwhile. Three months. Meanwhile, you’re probably trying to allow that song to ferment a little bit to soak in. But they’ve already written you off. And it’s not easy. Oftentimes, artists don’t bounce back.

Kahlil Wonda:
We’ve got another one hit wonder show coming up soon.

Reggae Music Forever:
As a matter of fact, I was listen to that one night. I was listening to that last week. I had it on my phone. And, you know, I was ironing my clothes, getting ready to go to work, preparing for work the next day. And my wife heard it. She’s like, “who are those guys? They’re quite disrespectful.” She say a who them? How dem so Disrespectful? I’m like and at the start of it, I remember you said some people might find this disrespectful… And then she goes “Would you do an episode like this?” I was like, “no, I’m not doing I’m not treading those waters yet.”

AGARD:
Don’t let her hear the retirement episode then.

Reggae Music Forever:
Kudos to you guys. But that was very entertaining. Very entertaining, by the way. If you haven’t listened to Reggae Lover podcast. The one hit wonder episode, peeps. I need you guys to go listen to it.

Kahlil Wonda:
Yeah, man. Good stuff, man. So I’m just going to change gears a little bit. What’s another thing that, you know, if you weren’t doing reggae talk reggae music forever, if that was not the band that you were marching with what’s another passion that you have outside of reggae that you know, you could see yourself doing?

Reggae Music Forever:
I mean, I’m a writer. I’m a writer. When I was in college, I wrote for publications. I wrote for the school paper. You know, I’m a writer. I probably would have been writing for, like, a number… I still… I was talking with my good friends the other day. She hit me up like, “Hey do you want to write for this publication? You write all kind of stuff on Instagram every day. You might as well.” I’ll be writing articles, like scholarly articles about the culture, like one of my biggest inspirations is a professor named Cynthia Cooper from… She’s a professor. I don’t think she’s still a professor right now at the University of West Indies. [OK] You guys are familiar with her? You remember Vybz Kartel did some kind of symposium. [Oh, yeah, yeah] If you haven’t checked her out and peeps, I need you guys go check her out like her articles are amazing.Yeah man. I’d probably be doing some kind of scholarly work on the culture. Writing things and research-based stuff. That’s really my passion.

AGARD:
That’s cool. That’s what’s needed.

Reggae Music Forever:
And that’s kind of like what influenced the reggae music Forever blog. Before the reggae talk podcast. I was blogging for years. You know, I used to write long, long captions, long article type stuff. I don’t do that anymore because people don’t read. So I kind of like, condense things, you know? I would be doing some kind of publishing.

AGARD:
I was going to say earlier, like some of stuff you post on our blog. It’s like the way you find a way to ask the question. You know, I’m saying sometimes it just blows my mind, yo, because I’m like, yo, that is true engagement right there. You know, I feel like I have to do a lot more studying and to be able to do that.

Reggae Music Forever:
Appreciate that.

Kahlil Wonda:
Nah man. You can’t study that man. You know, I’m saying a just talent. No, just kidding.

AGARD:
Its like you have it or you don’t know, Right?

Kahlil Wonda:
That’s it. That’s how it comes off the way that you do it. I mean, it doesn’t seem like it’s some. It’s not like a book thing. It’s more like a natural, you know, like you had this curiosity and like an analytical kind of mind, you know. And so, like you said, like I was saying, you know, people get sucked in, man. They get drawn in. And then the next thing you know, they spent, like, all this time when they should have been working and they’re like debating and reading responses.

Reggae Music Forever:
Sometimes I look at some things that people write on the blog, man, and I’m like, OMG. People write like, you know, like a 300 page, 300 words, like long. That’s not even stuff that… Some people, DM me every day. And they write like long stuff. And they say that, you know, your followers. I don’t want to be in there. So I’d rather talk to you personally. Oh, boy. Sometimes it’s so much I’m like, I’m at work or I’m busy with my kids and I’ll just let it stay there till I get some down time and I’ll read it. And I respond to everybody. That’s it. That’s the next thing to with the social media. You have to respond to people. Yeah, man, people hit me up all the time. Like, “how do I build a following?” You have to respond to people. You got to give people like meaningful, insightful responses. If you can’t do it now, do it later.

Kahlil Wonda:
You a do it the right way, man, because, you know, trust me,there’s a big knowledge gap. Just generally speaking, a lot of entrepreneurs, a lot of people want to start businesses and they you know, they’re clueless. They may think they know what they’re doing. But, you know, there’s a time commitment aspect to it where you really have even if you don’t care, you have to seem like you care and you have to talk. It’s a conversation. It’s an ongoing conversation.

Reggae Music Forever:
It’s time management as well. Because, you know, you gotta set time for your family. You gotta set time for your wife, your kids, your friends. And people want you to respond to them, you know? So it’s all about building. It’s building the brand. You got to take it serious at every step of the way. Yeah.

Kahlil Wonda:
Yeah. Thanks for sharing. I think that our listeners will get a lot out of this and hopefully, they’ll be checking out reggae talk and subscribing to that podcast and also to the reggae music forever. So I want to close out with this question, it’s kind of along the same lines as some stuff you just dropped. Right? Like you talking about people responding like 300 words, writing a book and its like, bro. Really? You know, like I saw one. OK. There was this post that jumped out at me. DJ Black Scorpion. Big up deejay, black scorpion. You know, he’s doing his thing online as well.

Reggae Music Forever:
Big up Black Scorpion.

Kahlil Wonda:
He posted and you reposted it to your blog and he made a statement about his opinion that reggae is on life support right now. You remember that one? And he said that in 20 years or by the year 2040, that reggae would be controlled by Europe and amongst other claims that he made. And you posted it and you were like not to quote you, but I’ll paraphrase, you were just like, I’ma leave this right here. Imma let you guys comment on this right here. You know, I mean and then. Yeah, you know, eighty-two comments later, it was like, yo, this is some serious isht right here. So I just want to you know, I don’t think you gave your opinion. What’s your opinion? The future of reggae prediction from Sean at a.k.a. Reggae Music Forever.

Reggae Music Forever:
Kahlil, you did your research, bro. That was a while ago. Wow. As far as Black Scorpion claiming that reggae music will be on life support in 40 years, is what he said?

Kahlil Wonda:
Twenty years, the year 2040.

Reggae Music Forever:
I don’t know about that, but one thing I do know…

Kahlil Wonda:
Actually, I think he was saying reggae’s on life support now and that in 20 years from now, there will be more reggae coming out from artists. that are non-Jamaican, you know, and maybe in terms of corporately, there’ll be a lot of control centered in Europe.

Reggae Music Forever:
How could I not agree with that man? I mean, the writing is on the wall. Bro, you spoke about it earlier, you spoke about the Cali Reggae. The Polynesian Reggae, the Pacific Reggae. And don’t forget about Europe. So many different regions are doing their own versions of reggae music. So many fans, it’s like generations and generations are starting to come about now and they don’t even know our Jamaican homegrown reggae artists. Don’t forget, Chronixx. Before Chronixx became the big star that he is today. He opened up for Rebelution. Chronixx had to open up. He was a massive star in Jamaica and he had to go and Rebelution’s tour.

Kahlil Wonda:
So did Morgan Heritage. So did Raging Fyah.

Reggae Music Forever:
The big, Morgan heritage. Grammy winning, icons, legends. They had they… And it’s not easy to get on these tours. Many of our legends, many of our borderline icons, legends, they’re going on the on these festivals and they’re performing. And there are tons of fans. 20, 30, 40 thousand people who have no idea who these artists are, but they know they’re homegrown, their version of events. And these guys are top of the charts. They’re top of the charts. The green. Whats the other band?

Kahlil Wonda:
Stick figure. SOJA

Reggae Music Forever:
SOJA was on Grammy-nominated.

Kahlil Wonda:
Tribal Seeds.

Reggae Music Forever:
Yes. Tribal seeds. All these guys.

Kahlil Wonda:
Slightly Stupid is another one.

Reggae Music Forever:
And that’s just the American Reggae artists. We didn’t get started with the euro Reggae artist and we didn’t get started with the Polynesian Reggae artists. Big up J Boog. J Boog is a real one. Yeah, man, I like his music. And other regions around the world. The writing’s on the wall. If our Jamaican artists do not figure things. Not only the artists… The industry. If we don’t figure. If we don’t fix our house and figure out how to get our music back on the level where it used to be and elevate our music, then pretty much we’re going to be second nature. Other reasons are already creating their own reggae music. So why are they going to need us? And as a matter of fact. Elephant Man, talk about it all the time. Not, all the time in one interview. Elephant Man, talk about Pretty much Justin.

AGARD:
Justin Bieber and Ed Sheeran.

Reggae Music Forever:
…demand a certain amount of money going to certain places. However, other artists who are singing reggae or dancehall music from other regions. They’re making the big bucks. So it’s like our stock is not the same as what he used to be. And that’s because we’ve allowed… We’ve allowed other regions… Reggae music is for everybody. However, but Jamaica is the source. We have allowed other people to infiltrate our music and create their own industries. To the point where we’re not a precious commodity anymore and we can’t demand… We can’t demand what we used to demand anymore. We cannot go on Cali reggae fest and headline because our market is… Not our market. Our brand is not really poppin in those regions. AGARD, what do you think?

AGARD:
I mean, I agree with every word. I agree with every word. I mean, you know, this thing I feel like there’s a difference between being regional community based and being international national. I think a lot of the artists that are coming out right now, a community base, maybe even regional, you know, I mean, like when you when you talk about, like the 6six or these artists, you know, they’re mentioning specific areas of Jamaica where people in the States, maybe in Canada and Europe, who used to live in Jamaica can associate with it. But it’s still a small amount of people compared to everybody else that are relating to these other bands, you know? I mean, we talked about Bob Marley earlier. The universe-ality and his music didn’t set aside anyone. Anybody could listen to a Bob Marley song and say, yo, I could relate to it. Not everybody listen to, you know, some of these artists right now say I could relate to it because it’s very unique to the reggae culture or a local culture, a regional culture. So, I mean, that’s the only thing I would have to add other than that. I agree with everything that you’re saying. I mean, it’s sad and hopefully it could get turned around. I mean, there’s some young artists right now that are trying their very hardest to make it better. But I don’t know.

Reggae Music Forever:
You see those festivals in Europe and in the summertime? I love it, but also I feel very concerned when I see those things because we’re not having those festivals in Jamaica or the Caribbean. Those I mean, those festivals are like Woodstockesque.

Kahlil Wonda:
I mean, several, several days.

AGARD:
But that’s the part. Right. You know, Bushman had his whole impassioned plea because… No, no seriously, there’s only a handful amount of shows like that that remain. And he’s saying, like all these artists, its overbooked. You know, I’m sure some of these artists would rather get like half an hour, 45 minutes and then go every other year or something rather than 10 minutes.

Kahlil Wonda:
17 minutes. Cut down to eight.

AGARD:
Yeah. You know. Yeah. I don’t know. Every time we get on this topic I get kind of like flustered a little bit.

Reggae Music Forever:
Yo bro. Me too man. It’s a little… People. Reggae Lover podcast listeners do not get it misconstrued. Reggae music is for everybody, but this is Jamaica. This is the source we’re talking about. This is the source. If the music is more revered and the culture and the vibe is more revered in Germany. When I’m watching a Reggae Geel. Reggae Geel, Is it Germany?

Kahlil Wonda:
Reggae, reggae, Geel, That France.

Reggae Music Forever:
I mean, that thing is just it’s just powerful. Reggae Sunskaa. That’s another one. Those festivals, it’s on another level. And I’m like, why can’t we have that in Jamaica?

Kahlil Wonda:
Or at Rottottam Sunsplash. Rottottam in Spain. Oh, my. It’s like they have. Like there’s so, man. Just the amount of content. It’s just… It’s unbelievable. It’s unbelievable.

AGARD:
Yeah, some of these festivals, they have sound clash day in Europe.

Kahlil Wonda:
Numerous sound systems, full… Yo the dub box them full up so til… you know, because the thing is, all the artists right there, all the roots, all the reggae foundation artists, you know, everybody. They’re right there.

Reggae Music Forever:
I’m a little in my feelings right now. And every time I talk about that, I feel like it’s slipping out of our fingers. I swear. Honestly.

Kahlil Wonda:
Well, here’s the thing. All right. Here’s my take on it. Like, you know, I cosign what you guys said. It’s kind of like. So it’s like you have a foundation, you’re standing there, you’re on your floor. But your house was built with no walls. So therefore, everybody walks through and they’re in your living room. They’re in your kitchen. They’re standing today in your face. And they’ve been there. So if you now say. Excuse me, excuse me, would you please leave or if you say, you know, like Martin, get the step in, you know, come out to my house however you want to say it. You try to run them. They’re gonna be like, what? You know, we’ve been here. What are you talking about? You know, I’m saying. So basically, what you guys are saying, the way you’re describing it, it sounds like, you know, I’m saying the whole thing already run amuck, you know.

Reggae Music Forever:
Is the infrastructure sucks. Like you said no walls so somebody could just walk in.

Kahlil Wonda:
Yeah. Some things. Yeah. We don’t have no infrastructure. There’s no business to be fought over. There’s no walls. There’s no boundaries. So even now to say, yo, we gonna build this its like, we’re way, you know, way behind. Or should I say the Jamaican music industry is way behind the rest of the world when it comes to that. All right. So then now I’m going to give my silver lining because I always come through at the end with the positive spin.

Reggae Music Forever:
We need right now.

Kahlil Wonda:
And so my hopes rest upon certain individuals. Obviously, the artists that are able to grace the stages of the Cali roots circuit. In 2019, you know, we know some of them. We mentioned them, you know, your Proteje, your Chronixx and the like. People like Shaggy I think are important. I think, you know, he’s got a new album now that he’s coming out with without Sting. So I’m just curious to see how that is.

Reggae Music Forever:
It’s out already. I actually checked it out.

OK, OK. Well, what was the word?

Solid. So, you know, glimmer of hope there because you know, he does his business. He’s done it before. Actually the reggae album he did before wasn’t really that great, like commercially with Ne-Yp. And with the combo with him and Beres, you know. The Beres tune was big in dancehall. But, you know, obviously he didn’t get a Grammy for that one. So we’ll see what happens this go around. But then, yeah, what I was really going to say is, you know, I’m inspired by Koffee. I’m saying she says “2030 we still a dweet.” Like I believe her.

Reggae Music Forever:
Check out her new promo, by the way. Yeah. I was listening earlier. I’ll be quick. I was listening earlier. She has a new little promo video on Instagram and she speaks about carrying on the legacy of Jamaican music. I thought that was mind-blowing. She said that’s her vision, is to carry on the legacy of Jamaican music. I thought that was mind-blowing. Coming from someone who is, what is she like 19?

Kahlil Wonda:
Yeah.

Reggae Music Forever:
Yeah. And that’s why her future’s so bright.

Kahlil Wonda:
Very bright. There’s no filler. No fluff with that artists. Who was I listening to? I was listening to an elder on an interview. I don’t remember which one it was and they were talking about Lila Ike as well. In terms of her future, her quality. And then, you know, like one thing that Cross touched on is that she doesn’t have a lot of songs. So, you know, letting these songs bubble and grow. Going about things the right way, you know? So in terms of the business, you know, we see like a little nucleus of energy coming out with, you know, with artists this year and last year. And then my guy Walshy with his new album, ABENG. It’s a Afrobeat slash dancehall album. But, you know, it’s his first album. And I just, you know, I have high hopes for how that’s going to do. And, you know, some of the trends that are going to come out of that. So the song that he had out with Alkaline, the first single. I love the song, in my opinion, is like the best ALKA song so far. That’s just in my humble opinion.

AGARD:
Alkaline verse is sick.

Reggae Music Forever:
I like Alkaline verse. Alkaline verse is good.

Kahlil Wonda:
I think that stuff is going to go global. And I think it’s going to you know, everything may not be traditional roots reggae as we know it, but I think it’s enough to keep the pulse going. If we’re on life support, I’m saying we got to keep it going. We’re not coming off of the machine. And as long as that’s the case, I’m saying there’s hope of a full recovery.

AGARD:
Word.

Reggae Music Forever:
Sounds good, word.

Kahlil Wonda:
These guys aren’t buying it. Yo, Sean, man, this was great.

AGARD:
That was our discussion with Sean aka Reggae music forever from Reggae talk. The Reggae Talk Podcast. Recently, Sean has actually been doing his interviews with artists, producers, anybody in the industry from his Instagram live. Check them out on Instagram. That’s @reggaemusicforever, I know he mentioned that. But he continues to ask, you know, profound questions about, you know, reggae, dancehall culture where it’s at right now. Throughout these times. So, yeah, definitely check him out. You know, we’d love to have him on again. We probably will have him on again.

Kahlil Wonda:
It’s amazing. You know, listening back to that, what I thought interesting was outside of the talk about doing live podcast events, much of the conversation was very relevant to what we’re still experiencing today. Mentioned some new artists that were fresh on the scene. Those artists are still fresh on the scene, so to speak. Still bubbling. Just cool to have the perspective of people who have their fingers on the pulse of what’s going on in the business.

AGARD:
Definitely. Listeners also do remember, check out a brand spanking new website for the podcast Reggae Lover dot com.

Kahlil Wonda:
Remember every Monday at 12:00 p.m. California time or three p.m. New York time, you can tune into NiceUPradio dot com for a special edition of the reggae podcast. Big up to nice up radio and the whole family out there.

AGARD:
Yemen big up every time.

Kahlil Wonda:
Can’t wait to debut the new season next week. Please tune in. Please share the links. Tell a friend to tell a friend. This is a dedication to reggae lovers everywhere.

AGARD:
Peace.

Outro voiceover:
Outro.

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